BBC Trust review of News and Current Affairs published

Readers may recall that last autumn the BBC Trust announced an audience consultation regarding its news and current affairs content.

The results of that consultation have now been published and can be viewed here.BBC News

“We carried out a public consultation at the end of 2013 and received over 9,000 responses from licence fee payers. We also commissioned qualitative and quantitative audience research to inform our thinking for the review. We received a number of responses from the industry and other stakeholder organisations and have spoken to a number of the other news providers in the UK. We also interviewed many of the BBC’seditors, commissioners and most senior journalists. This evidence, alongside performance monitoring and financial analysis, has given us a clear picture of the current state of the BBC’s network journalism as well as identifying areas where it can develop.”

In 2012/13 there were over 25 million licence fee payers in the UK. A sample size of 9,000 random participants in this consultation might therefore appear to many to be too small to produce a reliable “clear picture of the current state of the BBC’s network journalism”.

Background material to the review – including a statement from ‘Jews for Justice for Palestinians’ – can be seen here.

The BBC’s own reporting on the review can be read here and a slightly different perspective can be seen here

6 comments on “BBC Trust review of News and Current Affairs published

  1. I clicked the link and started to read the headline results of the consultation. Apparently it’s audience is entirely satisfied and it just needs more money to get to those people it doesn’t currently reach.

    Oh well that’s all right then. Internally judged consultation has established the BBC is doing just fine.

    So not complacent, arrogant, self serving or in any way misleading or in any way in need of wholesale, deep or thorough, top down reform? Well that’s ok then. Business as usual.

    • I command the BBC for producing impartial information of the highest standard on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, in spite of political pressure.

  2. Duvidl really cannot be bothered to read any of the corrupt BBC’s clap-trap about itself since it spent £5 million of licence fee-payers’ money on various useless internal reports on the horrors of the late Sir James Savile’s 52 years of paedophilia and child rapes, some on BBC premises. But Duvidl did make himself read this extract from Mark Sweney’s linked report in the anti-Israel Guardian newspaper.

    “The BBC Trust said more can also be done to increase the impact of BBC2’s Newsnight – which has seen its audience fall by 30% since 2009 – but gave an overall stamp of approval to the corporation’s efforts to overhaul the show under new editor Ian Katz.”

    Newsnight, the BBC’s flagship news programme, folllowing the debacle of its false paedophilia claims against Lord McAlpine, had Ian Katz from The Guardian newspaper forcibly appointed by the post-Savile paedophilia debacle director-general Lord Tony Hall. Today Newsnight’s most well-known presenter, Jeremy Paxman, has announced his retirement to a life of fly fishing, says one Sky TV news pundit, because he does not “get on” with Ian. The Machiavellian Isra-hating BBC-Guardian axis, of course, remains in place.

  3. NB. BBC Watchers may wonder why Parliament did not announce a public inquiry into the Savile scandal rather than authorise £5 million of public expenditure on the above-mentioned waste-of-money internal reports. The answer is that then culture secretary Maria Miller MP blocked a public inquiry. Low and behold, Maria has, last month quit as culture secretary over corruption allegations about her personal expenses, leaving the corrupt BBC still un-investigaed by the public, which funds it.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/mps-expenses/conservative-mps-expenses/10754010/Maria-Miller-resigns-as-Culture-Secretary-over-expenses-claims.html

  4. Pingback: Discussion of the BBC Trust’s review of News and Current Affairs | BBC Watch

Comments are closed.