BBC Travel’s basic geography fail

h/t @jasonlax

On May 13th the BBC website’s ‘Travel’ section published an article by Amanda Ruggeri – editor of the ‘BBC Britain’ website – which was also promoted on the BBC News site.

Titled “The hidden world of the Knights Templar“, the article is described as follows:

“Tucked behind London’s Fleet Street, a patchwork of gardens and graceful buildings tell the story of the most famous knights of the Crusades.”

SONY DSC

Acco – Israel

Unfortunately, that interesting piece is marred by a rather basic geographical inaccuracy:

“By that point, the knights were no longer needed as crusaders. Their military stronghold of Acre, in present-day Syria, had fallen in 1291. The knights were still engaging in smaller-scale raids, but the Crusades had effectively ended – and, for the Church, had not ended well.” [emphasis added]

Acre (Acco), with its beautifully restored Crusader buildings is of course located in northern Israel.

Update, 18/5/16:

BBC Travel has now corrected the inaccuracy.

Before:

Acre in Syria before

After:

correction Acre

 

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8 comments on “BBC Travel’s basic geography fail

  1. The BBC’s deliberate errors concerning all matters Israeli are well beyond a joke. I visit Acco regularly as it’s easily accessible from where i live in Karmiel, Galilee both by car and bus. It’s most certainly no where near Syria. How daft!

  2. No surprise at all for this error – that the BBC should have corrected before publishing. But what else do we expect from such a c**p organisation !

  3. I suppose this is another piece of bbc’s WAR against Israel not to mention its name, location of places etc. Of course it’s CHILDISH and stupid and this why the anti Israel bunch of creeps are losing the war and they know it and makes them even more mad. These are signs Israel is prevailing not only in situ of course but also the pr war at long last.

  4. By now they’ve “corrected” the inaccuracy. The BBC now says Acre is “near the borders of Lebanon and Syria”. OK, the Lebanese border is within 20 km from the city. But even the 1948-67 ceasefire line (not a border, of course) with Syria is 50 kilometres away, all the way on the other side of the country!

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