Error acknowledged, complaint upheld – yet BBC inaccuracy still remains online

Back in August we noted that the BBC had published acknowledgement of an inaccuracy that had appeared in a BBC Radio 4 programme in May 2017 on its ‘Corrections and Clarifications’ page.

When notification of that correction was received, BBC Watch had already submitted a Stage 2 complaint to the BBC’s Executive Complaints Unit. The ECU has now informed us that the complaint was upheld.  

However, the programme concerned is still available online and it has not been edited to correct the presenter’s inaccurate claim (from 38:10) of “Jewish riots in the 1940s” in Manchester. Neither has any footnote been added to the webpage informing audiences that the ECU upheld a complaint concerning that statement.

BBC Watch has written to the ECU once again, pointing out that such an absurd situation does not inspire public confidence in BBC handling of editorial complaints.

Update: 

The BBC’s ECU has responded to BBC Watch’s communication:

“The programmes which remain available online stand as a record of what was broadcast, and the BBC doesn’t rewrite the record by editing them unless there’s some overriding reason to do so.  The usual action, where an error has been acknowledged, is to flag the fact on the relevant programme page and add a link to the published summary of the finding.  This has now been done in the case of the 23 May edition of The World Tonight.  I’m sorry it wasn’t done in time to forestall your email of 4 December.”

Related Articles:

BBC Radio 4’s ‘The World Tonight’ inverts history in Manchester

After nearly 3 months, BBC finally corrects Manchester inaccuracy

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8 comments on “Error acknowledged, complaint upheld – yet BBC inaccuracy still remains online

    • Is it possible to take out a TORT action against what is a re-writing of history?
      It is somewhat of a personal insult to those affected.
      Will they tell us next that Jewish people were responsible for the East End Sidney Street
      attacks? That Mosley’s Brown Shirts were just poor frail little flowers, who were paying a tea party, visit?

  1. Yes, Stephen, please do, I know you are a fighter for BBC accuracy, but as a journalist myself and former BBC employee I know that apologies after the event have little or no effect. The British public’s negative attitude to Israel is shaped to a large extent by the ugly anti-Israel and anti-Jewish bias of the BBC. Tonight’s programme on the Balfour Declaration will echo this, a foretaste by this man Reynolds, who calls himself a historian, was given this morning in a trailer, when he claimed that the Declaration was a blessing for some and a disaster for others, despite the fact that there was little if any Arab hostility to it at the time it was produced.

    • This echoes newspaper behavior where Lurid Inaccurate Headlines only receive a small typeface institutional correction at the bottom of page 7. There needs to be equal prominence to all corrections otherwise apologies are insincere. There needs to be another program given equal prominence and length.- that should include airtime and position and equal trailers.

  2. Is it possible to take out a TORT action against what is a re-writing of history?
    It is somewhat of a personal insult to those affected.
    Will they tell us next that Jewish people were responsible for the East End Sidney Street
    attacks? That Mosley’s Brown Shirts were just poor frail little flowers, who were paying a tea party, visit?

  3. Pingback: 12/05 Links Pt2: UK Govt. funds PA salaries to terrorists; The Taylor Force Act Has Been Gutted; Is Europe Promoting the Next Mideast Massacre? – 24/6 Magazine

  4. Hangon the presenter said “Jewish riots”,
    when he should have said “anti-Jewish riots”
    But “bread riots ” are not about bread rioting
    As a native speaker I would not think that the riots were caused by Jews, but rather they were the topic of the riots.
    … Of the many mistakes the BBC makes each day, this is not significant.

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