BBC News coverage of terrorism in Israel – March 2018

The Israel Security Agency’s report on terror attacks (Hebrew) during March 2018 shows that throughout the month a total of 136 incidents took place: 111 in Judea & Samaria, nineteen in Jerusalem, one inside the ‘green line’ and five in the Gaza Strip and Sinai sectors.

In Judea & Samaria and Jerusalem the agency recorded 114 attacks with petrol bombs, nine attacks using improvised explosive devices, three shooting attacks, one stabbing attack, one vehicular attack, one stoning attack and one arson attack. A vehicular attack was recorded in Acco and incidents in the Gaza Strip/Sinai sector included one shooting attack and one IED attack. No missile or mortar attacks were recorded during March.

Two members of the security forces were murdered in a vehicular attack near Mevo Dotan on March 16th which was reported on the BBC News website. One civilian was murdered in a stabbing attack in Jerusalem on March 18th which was reported the next day .

Nine people were wounded in attacks during March – four of them in the vehicular attack in Acco on March 4th which did not receive any BBC coverage. A stoning attack on a civilian motorist near the Hizme checkpoint in Jerusalem was not reported and neither was an IED attack on the Gaza Strip border on March 15th.

In all, the BBC News website reported 1.47% of the terror attacks that took place during March 2018. Since the beginning of the year the BBC has reported 1.49% of the attacks and 100% of the fatalities. Just one of the six separate incidents of rocket and mortar fire from the Gaza Strip that have taken place since the beginning of the year has been mentioned in BBC News website coverage.

Related Articles:

BBC News coverage of terrorism in Israel – February 2018

BBC News coverage of terrorism in Israel – January 2018

BBC News coverage of terrorism in Israel – December 2017 and year summary

BBC News continues to link terror to US embassy move

BBC News reports another fatal terror attack without the word terror

 

 

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BBC Travel still having trouble locating Acco

Back in May 2016 the BBC News website published an article by BBC Travel about the Knights Templar which included a geographical error.

“By that point, the knights were no longer needed as crusaders. Their military stronghold of Acre, in present-day Syria, had fallen in 1291. The knights were still engaging in smaller-scale raids, but the Crusades had effectively ended – and, for the Church, had not ended well.” [emphasis added]

Several days after publication, that inaccuracy was corrected and Acco (Acre) was accurately described in the body of the article as being located in “present-day Israel”.

The same article was republished on the BBC News website on January 3rd but it still includes an inaccurate footnote added after that correction was made nearly eight months ago.

footnote-templars-art

To get from Acco to the border with Lebanon one has to drive for about half an hour and to get to the border with Syria – right across the other side of the country – takes at least an hour and a half by car. In order to be “near the borders of Lebanon and Syria”, Acco would have to be located in the Upper Galilee – over 80 kms from its actual location.

map-acco

Clearly BBC Travel’s geographical knowledge still leaves much to be desired.    

 

BBC Travel’s basic geography fail

h/t @jasonlax

On May 13th the BBC website’s ‘Travel’ section published an article by Amanda Ruggeri – editor of the ‘BBC Britain’ website – which was also promoted on the BBC News site.

Titled “The hidden world of the Knights Templar“, the article is described as follows:

“Tucked behind London’s Fleet Street, a patchwork of gardens and graceful buildings tell the story of the most famous knights of the Crusades.”

SONY DSC

Acco – Israel

Unfortunately, that interesting piece is marred by a rather basic geographical inaccuracy:

“By that point, the knights were no longer needed as crusaders. Their military stronghold of Acre, in present-day Syria, had fallen in 1291. The knights were still engaging in smaller-scale raids, but the Crusades had effectively ended – and, for the Church, had not ended well.” [emphasis added]

Acre (Acco), with its beautifully restored Crusader buildings is of course located in northern Israel.

Update, 18/5/16:

BBC Travel has now corrected the inaccuracy.

Before:

Acre in Syria before

After:

correction Acre