BBC again passes up on Palestinian affairs reporting

When, on October 23rd, the BBC News website recycled an NGO’s report about torture carried out by “Palestinian forces” we observed that:

“While it is obviously refreshing to see this issue getting some exposure on the BBC’s website […] it is nevertheless notable that this is not a report by the BBC informing its funding public about the serious topic of torture conducted by Palestinian factions but the recycling of a report by an external organisation.

And so, BBC audiences still await serious, original BBC reporting on this issue as well as on other aspects of internal Palestinian affairs.”

Since that article was published the opportunity for the BBC’s locally based reporters to produce just such original reporting has arisen.

“A Palestinian court on Thursday extended the detention of a hunger-striking Palestinian-American activist who claims she was tortured in captivity.

Suha Jbara, 31, a US citizen born in Panama, shuffled into the Jericho courtroom with her head down, appearing ashen and weak. Her father and son reached out to embrace her but were restrained by Palestinian authorities. […]

She told the advocacy organization Amnesty International that after arresting her from her home in a midnight raid, Palestinian authorities tortured her and deprived her of water, sleep and medicine she needs for a heart condition. She said security officials threatened her with sexual violence and forced her to sign a document admitting to charges she says are false.”

Despite Jbara’s case having been taken up by Amnesty International – which the BBC is usually happy to quote and promote – BBC audiences have to date heard nothing of this story.

The same is true of a story concerning another US citizen who has been in Palestinian Authority custody since October.

“Issam Akel, who is also an American citizen, was arrested in Ramallah earlier in October by the Palestinian security forces for suspected involvement in the sale of a house in the Old City’s Muslim Quarter, near Herod’s Gate.”

Another story seemingly related to alleged land sales is that of Ahmed Salama who was shot dead on December 7th.

“A Palestinian man was shot to death on Friday in the Israeli Arab town of Jaljulia, and police are looking into suspicion that he was murdered due to his occupation as a seller of land plots in the West Bank to Jewish settlers. 

The man, who has been identified as Ahmed Salame, was a Palestinian hailing from the West Bank who married a Jaljulia resident. Anonymous perpetrators opened fire from a short range on the car he was driving.”

The fact that BBC audiences have to date heard nothing of any of these three stories should not come as much of a surprise given that only very occasionally are they provided with reporting on Palestinian affairs which is not framed within the context of ‘the conflict’ and coverage of social and human rights issues within Palestinian society is extremely sparse. 

Related Articles:

A second hand BBC News report on Palestinian torture

Two stories that fall outside BBC framing

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No BBC News follow-up on Golan paraglider story

Given the BBC’s longstanding – but recently intensified – preoccupation with ISIS and considering that on October 25th it published a report titled “‘Israeli Arab paraglider’ sparks Syria border operation“, it was surprising to see that BBC News chose to ignore the follow-up story to the incident portrayed in that article.Paraglider art

On November 18th the Israeli security services released a statement concerning the indictment of members of a cell of ISIS sympathisers from Jaljulia.

“Security forces services recently busted a group of six Israeli Arab men who planned to travel to Syria with the intention of fighting alongside the radical Islamic State group. A seventh member of the group succeeded in flying across the Israel-Syrian border on the Golan Heights on a hang glider last month.

In a statement Wednesday, the Shin Bet security service said the six suspects, all residents of the northern Israeli-Arab town of Jaljulia, had been planning for months to make their way to Syria. […]

The seventh member of the group, Nadal Hamad Salah Salah, 23, flew a hang glider across the border from the Golan Heights and into Syria on October 24, setting off an intensive investigation by security services.

As a result of the initial investigation, later the same evening two brothers were arrested, Jihad Nadal Yousef Hagala, 26 and Ahab Nadal Yousel Hagala, 22.

The brothers were known to police as supporters of the Islamic State group, the Shin Bet said. The elder brother, Jihad, spent six months in Syria in 2013 fighting with IS and was arrested after his return to Israel. He was tried, sentenced to prison, and released in November 2014.

During the investigation, it emerged that the brothers had helped Salah to make his exit to Syria to join IS, the indictment said. In recent months Salah had allegedly agreed with Jihad Nadal Yousef Hagala to use hang gliders to get to Syria. The pair planned to glide over the border because Hagala was concerned that, due to his history, he would be flagged and stopped by Israeli security if he tried flying out of Ben Gurion Airport on a commercial flight.”

Notably, the BBC also refrained from reporting on a previous story concerning an ISIS cell in northern Israel which came to light at the beginning of October.