A BBC correspondent’s recommended reading

h/t BM

“Presenters, reporters and correspondents are the public face and voice of the BBC – they can have a significant impact on perceptions of whether due impartiality has been achieved.  Our audiences should not be able to tell from BBC output the personal prejudices of our journalists or news and current affairs presenters on matters of public policy, political or industrial controversy, or on ‘controversial subjects’ in any other area.  They may provide professional judgements, rooted in evidence, but may not express personal views in BBC output, including online, on such matters.” (Section 4.4.13, BBC Editorial Guidelines on Impartiality)

“Impartiality is a particular concern for those working in News and Current Affairs. Nothing should appear on their personal blogs or microblogs which undermines the integrity or impartiality of the BBC. For example, News and Current Affairs staff should not:

  • advocate support for a particular political party;
  • express views for or against any policy which is a matter of current party political debate;
  • advocate any particular position on an issue of current public controversy or debate.”

(BBC Guidance on Social Networking and Other Third Party Websites (including Blogs, Microblogs and Personal Webspace): Personal Use)

Given the above it is obviously less than ideal for a BBC correspondent to be found retweeting an article supposedly “Exposing the fake anti-Semitism scandal manufactured to shatter Labour’s left-wing” – especially when that article was written by a well-known professional anti-Israel activist renowned for making up delusional allegations and straying into the realms of antisemitism.

Meet the BBC economics correspondent Andrew Verity.

Verity profile

This is apparently what he thinks is worth reading “on an issue of current public controversy or debate”.

Verity Tweet

 

Sourcing an anti-Israel libel promoted on BBC Radio 4

When anti-Israel campaigner Ken Loach appeared on BBC Radio 4’s ‘The World Tonight’ on February 25th, one of the more delusional allegations heard by listeners (and the competition was tough) was that during the 2014 conflict between Israel and Hamas, Israeli troops “executed” Hebrew speakers in the Gaza Strip.The World Tonight 25 2

“Will they go to Gaza and see the rubble? Will they see the schools that were bombed by Israel in 2014? Will they see the hospitals that were targeted by Israel? Will they see the places where families were herded together and then executed? Will they hear about the people who were asked if they spoke Hebrew and if they spoke Hebrew they were executed?”

Not only was that allegation – and the many others – not questioned or challenged by the BBC’s Ritula Shah but Loach was not even asked to provide a source for such a serious charge. Hence, we decided to look for its source ourselves and the search did not take very long.

The inventor of that defamation is a man who has made a career out of lying about IsraelMax Blumenthal – and in 2014 he touted it at the so-called ‘Russell Tribunal on Palestine’, with further amplification from Rania Khalek at ‘electronic Intifada’

“Blumenthal described in vivid detail the grisly executions he documented of civilians, paramedics and fighters carried out by invading Israeli soldiers. He also highlighted several instances of Israeli soldiers summarily executing older men in Gaza after learning they spoke Hebrew, leading to speculation that soldiers were ordered to eliminate anyone capable of understanding their commands.”

Another fan of Blumenthal’s unsubstantiated allegations is Asa Winstanley who told readers of the Hamas-linked MEMO website that:

“According to several different eyewitnesses he spoke to, offering corroborating accounts of different incidents, it seems that Israeli soldiers were executing a new practice during this latest Gaza war. As Max puts it: “wanton targeting of Palestinian civilians who spoke Hebrew”.”

The fact that Radio 4 apparently did not see anything problematic about broadcasting that and additional spurious allegations without question or challenge of course prompts the question of what it is that supposedly differentiates the BBC from Hamas-supporting websites which promote and amplify the same defamation – but without demanding a licence fee.

Related Articles:

BBC interviewee and source banned from German parliament

Move over Galloway: BBC Radio Ulster airs pro-Assad & anti-Israel propaganda

Racist Alliance: Behind the scenes of the Russell Tribunal on Palestine and Pluto Press (UK Media Watch) 

Will ex-BBC Gunness tell the Frontline Club how he got a BBC article rewritten?

On July 29th the Frontline Club in London will hold the event described below.

frontline club event 1

So who is scheduled to be on that “panel of journalists”? At the moment it appears to consist of two people.

frontline club event 2

Readers considering attending the event and seeking advance insight into what they might hear from the generously portrayed Mr Blumenthal can find information collated by our colleagues at UK Media Watch here and at CAMERA here. A particularly useful research paper on Blumenthal’s book ‘Goliath: Life and Loathing in Greater Israel’ by Petra Marquardt-Bigman can be found here.

Those participating in the event might of course take the opportunity to ask Chris Gunness about his apparent role in instigating the politically motivated rewrite of the August 8th 2014 BBC article titled “Caution needed with Gaza casualty figures“. Licence fee payers in the audience and further afield would, after all, probably be very interested to learn about the potential for outside influence on BBC editorial decisions. 

The event will also be available live on the Frontline Club’s Youtube channel.

Related Articles:

BBC College of Journalism “associations”