Misinformation from BBC’s Kevin Connolly on From Our Own Correspondent

The March 19th edition of BBC Radio 4’s ‘From Our Own Correspondent’ included an item by Kevin Connolly (available from 06:19 here) described as follows in the programme’s synopsis:FOOC 19 3

“…a stunning election victory for Benjamin Netanyahu in Israel — but it means frustration, anger and dismay for the country’s Palestinian population…”

As has been noted here in previous discussions of BBC coverage of the recent Israeli election (see here and here), one topic which all the corporation’s journalists avoided like the plague in all its reporting was that of foreign funding for organisations such as V15 which campaigned to influence the outcome of the election. In this report, however, Kevin Connolly goes a step beyond omission, actively misinforming listeners when he says (from around 09:00):

“…Mr Netanyahu now has the chance to replace a rather fractious and recalcitrant old coalition with a new one, which should prove more manageable. Foreign governments, of course, are far too well-behaved to interfere in the internal politics of a democratic state. But the outside world tends to view Israeli politics through the prism of the state of the peace process with the Palestinians.” [emphasis added]

Whether or not US tax-payers’ money was used in the V15 campaign remains to be seen – as the Free Beacon recently reported:

“The head of a progressive U.S.-based group that helped organize the failed get-out-the-vote effort to challenge Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel defended the initiative during a panel discussion at J Street’s annual conference on Sunday.

Kenneth Bob, who runs the U.S. nonprofit Ameinu, said around a year ago the group began meeting with board members, political parties, and other progressive organizations to figure out “what can we actually do to impact events on the ground in Israel.”

“It took us on a path to learn about Israeli electoral funding laws, and it brought us to a project that has now gotten a certain amount of publicity thanks to the prime minister of Israel,” said Bob. “We helped put together a get-out-the-vote effort in the Arab community.”

Netanyahu called on his supporters to turn out to vote last Tuesday to counter U.S.-funded efforts aimed at bringing out left-leaning and Arab-Israeli voters. His comments earned rebukes from the White House, which has suggested that he was trying to discourage minority voting.

Bob said Netanyahu’s characterization of the campaign was accurate, although the prime minister overstated how much money it had received.

“When Bibi spoke about the tens of millions of dollars pouring into this effort, my only correction was it wasn’t tens of millions,” said Bob. “He exaggerated a little bit.” […]

Several organizations that have received funding from the U.S. State Department—including OneVoice, Givat Haviva and the Abraham Fund Initiatives—were also involved in the voter-targeting efforts. A bipartisan Senate committee launched an investigation earlier this month into whether any U.S. government funds had been used for this campaign.” [emphasis added]

What is already known, however, is that foreign governments regularly interfere in internal Israeli politics by means of funding for assorted NGOs. Those governments include the United Kingdom, the United States, Ireland and Norway – to name but a few of the countries which are considerably less “well-behaved” than Connolly tries to make out.

Connolly then provides listeners with more misinformation:

“Outsiders will want to know what chance there is now of convening talks or what chance they might have of succeeding if they could be convened. The truth is that the process was already feeling pretty moribund. There’s been no movement since an American-brokered attempt at negotiations fizzled out last year. Now, it feels more moribund still.” [emphasis added]

The last round of talks between Israel and the PLO did not “fizzle out” as Connolly claims: they came to an abrupt end when the Fatah controlled  Palestinian Authority opted for a reconciliation deal with Hamas: a terrorist organization which does not recognize either Israel’s right to exist or existing agreements between Israel and the Palestinians under the Oslo Accords.

Of course accurate representation of the reasons for the failure of the last round of talks would have put a decided damper on the multi-platform campaign to portray the ‘peace process’ as being entirely dependent upon the results of Israel’s election which was evident throughout the BBC’s coverage of that event. This contribution from Connolly may well fit the chosen editorial line, but it is not accurate and deliberately misleads BBC audiences.  

Related Articles:

BBC’s Knell promotes political church campaign supported by BBC funder

Background to the BBC’s inaccurate framing of the end of Middle East talks

Revisiting the BBC’s framing of the 2013/14 Israel-PLO negotiations

 

4 comments on “Misinformation from BBC’s Kevin Connolly on From Our Own Correspondent

  1. Meanwhile here is BBC director-general Lord Tony Hall, who this weekend received a death threat for firing a motoring show host, speaking at an ORT dinner last Tuesday about the BBC’s perceived biased coverage of Israel. It appears motoring fantasy inspires stronger British emotions than BBC bias on world events.

    http://www.algemeiner.com/2015/03/29/bbc-honcho-says-tough-to-present-balanced-coverage-of-israel-hamas-war/

  2. This takes me back to Connolly’s mockery of both Netanyahu and Congress on the World Service programme, ‘Outside Source,’ broadcast a few hours before his speech before Congress. Connolly sneered at the applause Netanyahu received in a past address to Congress and quoted anonymous Washington officials who regard Netanyahu as, “recalcitrant and pompous,” and so on.

    It was a transparent attempt to whip up contempt for Netanyahu and so influence the elections. If the BBC had a complaints process worth anything I would have complained. I thought it would suffice to simply send Connolly a rather unsubtle email re his propaganda. I suggested that his responsibilities as a reporter should go beyond trying to get a few smirks and nudge-nudge, wink-wink reactions from his anti-Israel colleagues at the BBC.

    He didn’t reply but the email didn’t bounce back at me so I assume he received it and possibly read it since it was short though not sweet. I would imagine that even BBC reporters are sensitive re their standing as ‘journalists’ and don’t like to be thought of as unprofessional and biased. So letting them know how they are perceived by some on whom their propaganda is inflicted might have an impact on their behaviour.

    Anyway it’s worth a try, using an address that the BBC has stopped making public but still exists:

    name.surname@bbc.co.uk

  3. Pingback: Elections 2015: was the BBC’s coverage impartial? | BBC Watch

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