No use of term ‘terror’ in BBC News report of vehicular attack on Israelis

On the morning of April 6th a vehicular attack took place near Ofra. One IDF soldier -Sgt. Elhai Teharlev, aged 20 – was murdered and another injured. The perpetrator was apprehended.

Shortly after news of the attack broke the BBC News website published a report titled “Israeli killed in West Bank car-ramming attack” which was later amended after the victim’s name was released.

“An Israeli soldier has been killed and another Israeli hurt in a Palestinian car-ramming attack in the occupied West Bank, the Israeli military says.

The military said the driver was taken into custody after the incident near the Jewish settlement of Ofra. […]

Witnesses told Israeli media that the car approached a bus stop at the Ofra junction, on the Route 60 highway north-east of Ramallah, and then accelerated towards the two Israelis waiting there.”

As usual – and in sharp contrast to many of the BBC’s reports on the vehicular attack in London just two weeks ago – the article does not include the words terror, terrorism or terrorist.

Even the terror organisation which subsequently praised the attack is described in tepid language:

“The Palestinian militant group, Hamas, praised what it called the “heroic” attack.”

In fact, as reported by the Jerusalem Post, Hamas had rather more to say than that.

“On Facebook Hamas spokesman Hazem Qassim praised the attack saying that “the Jerusalem Intifada is continuing its work that will only end with freedom. Once again, the Jerusalem Intifada proves that it isn’t a passing event, but rather a Palestinian decision to continue the struggle until freedom from occupation.”

“Once again, there is no safety for the occupation army or settlers as long as they deny our rights, occupy our land, and attack our people and its holy sites. Once again the youth, who are rising up in the West Bank, affirm that Palestine is their compass and resistance is a necessity. The occupation can only be their enemy. Endorsing and supporting the intifada is a national necessity and priority.””

Readers are told that:

“In late 2015 and 2016, such attacks by Palestinians or Israeli Arabs happened with near-daily frequency but the rate has dropped in recent months.”

Presumably the unidentified writer of this report intended the phrase “such attacks” to refer to terror attacks in general rather than specifically to vehicular attacks but in either case the claim is inaccurate.

Both January and February 2017 saw one vehicular attack take place. In 2016 two vehicular attacks took place in March, one in May, one in June, one in July and two in October. In the second half of 2015, one vehicular attack took place in August, three in October, eight in November and six in December – data here. So while the rate of vehicular attacks has dropped since the last quarter of 2015, it does not differ vastly from the rate in 2016.

The same is true of terror attacks in general. While in late 2015 the frequency of attacks was far beyond “near-daily”, with around a hundred attacks still taking place every month, they remain a daily occurrence on average, despite the BBC’s claim.

Perhaps if the BBC reported terror attacks against Israelis more consistently, it would be able to provide its audiences with more accurate information.

The article closes with a paragraph seen in numerous previous BBC reports:

“Israel has accused Palestinian leaders of inciting the attacks, but they have blamed frustration rooted in decades of Israeli occupation.”

It is worth remembering that since the surge in terror attacks in late 2015, the BBC has consistently failed to provide its audiences with any serious reporting on the topic of incitement and glorification of terrorism by Palestinian officials. Readers are hence unable to judge for themselves whether or not what ‘Israel says’ is accurate.

Likewise, it is noteworthy that the portrayal of terrorism as being attributable to “frustration rooted in decades of occupation” conforms to a guidance document for members of the international media put out by the PLO in November 2015.

Related Articles:

Absurdity of BBC’s ‘Language when Reporting Terrorism’ guidance on display again

BBC News coverage of terrorism in Israel – December 2016 and year summary

BBC News coverage of terrorism in Israel – December 2015 and Q4 summary

 

 

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7 comments on “No use of term ‘terror’ in BBC News report of vehicular attack on Israelis

  1. The BBC regards all such attacks as consistent with their narrative that Israel should not be in existence. It is quite ridiculous that the UK government does not intervene to halt this ridiculous Hamas propaganda machine from broadcasting its heinous trash.

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  3. Does the “frustration rooted in decades of Israeli occupation” include the multiple offers of peace made by Israel ? How many times have Palestinian leaders made peace overtures? So if you’re frustrated it’s ok to kill. Good to know. I’m pretty frustrated with Palestinian violence, intransigence, and incitement.

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